man praying in a cave

A Still, Small Voice

Can you imagine what it would have been like to witness the events that took place on Mount Carmel between Elijah and the prophets of Baal? Can you picture the false prophets dancing around, slashing themselves, pleading with their god to send fire down to burn up sacrifice? All the while, Elijah stands there mocking them and their gods saying, “Where is your god? Is he in the bathroom or is he asleep?” And then, finally, can you picture hearing Elijah’s prayer and the LORD’s miraculous answer? What an incredible display of God’s power and might!

I often pray for God to answer my prayers in a similar manner. I mean, I want to see him move in power! I want to see Him victorious over His enemies! I want the world to know that He alone is God! It seems to me that a “Mount Carmel-like” miracle would do the trick, right?

But, if I am honest, I’ve never seen anything that comes close to this in my life. I am not saying that it can’t happen, I just have yet to see God move in this manner today.

For a long time, I had difficulty understanding the events that took place after the definitive victory at Mount Carmel. Elijah flees in fear after Jezebel makes a personal death threat. He finds protection and safety in a cave at Mount Horeb, the place where Moses met with God. After asking why Elijah was there, the LORD tells Elijah to come out and stand in His presence. Suddenly, a powerful wind comes, followed by a strong earthquake, followed by more fire from heaven. But, the Scripture says that the LORD was not in these things.

Then, Elijah hears a gentle whisper. He comes out to meet with the LORD who speaks to Him gently: “What are you doing here, Elijah?”

And what was Elijah doing there? Why was he running from Jezebel after he had just witnessed the LORD defeat the several hundred prophets of Baal? It seems to me that when God’s judgement didn’t come upon Jezebel in Elijah’s timing, Elijah wondered if God was still working. By answering Elijah with a still, small voice God taught Elijah that He didn’t need natural disasters or miracles to prove His power. Even when Elijah couldn’t see it, God was still working.

Maybe you need a miracle today. You really need to see God’s mighty hand move. Or perhaps you have been praying for God to manifest His power in a Mount Carmel fashion. Let me encourage you to remember that God is God even when we don’t hear the roaring thunder. He is still on His throne even when we don’t see the flashing lightning. And He still speaks today, even if it is a still, small voice. Don’t be afraid when He is quiet. He is still the LORD God Almighty.


Scripture reading: 1 Kings 18-19

Song for reflection and prayer:

what are the little foxes in Song of Solomon 2:15

Love and War and Little Foxes

As some of my readers may have noticed, I haven’t been posting everyday like I had been doing earlier in the year. I had every intention of writing for 365 days straight, but things just didn’t work out that way.

Starting this blog wasn’t a New Year’s resolution of mine. It was born out of a very real need for communication in my heart language. When you go from one culture where you can fully express yourself and be understood, to a different culture where those things don’t come as easily or naturally, I think it is important to find some way to  “download” your thoughts. Otherwise, you start to go a little stir crazy.

From the beginning, this blog has been about developing a greater zeal for knowing and loving Jesus Christ. While blogging has truly helped me to organize and weigh all the thoughts I have floating around in my head, it has, first and foremost, helped me to become closer to my Savior.

The reason I stopped writing for the past couple of months wasn’t because I stopped trying to grow in my relationship with Christ. Rather, I stopped writing because I have been growing in my relationship with Christ. The past few months have been some of the most difficult spiritually on record. Recently, I have warred with doubt, fear, and insecurity, sometimes all at once. The enemy has been gunning for me, so to speak. But now, through spending more secret time alone with God, I am learning how to confront these things head on with His Word.

For much of my life, I have cowered from confrontation out of fear of losing someone or something I hold dear. Many times I have asked God to take the fear away without much avail. I realize now that I should instead pray for more love, for it is perfect love that casts out fear (1 John 4:18).

With that being said, I hope to begin writing more regularly again. In general, I pray that God would fill me with more joy, victory, hope, and love as I follow Christ. For me, this is a season of catching foxes. These are the things that seek to steal my joy and disrupt my intimacy with God.

Perhaps, it’s time for you to catch those little foxes too.

Catch the foxes for us,
    the little foxes
that spoil the vineyards,
    for our vineyards are in blossom.

Song of Songs 2:15

My God Sings

My God Sings

Often when I am driving in the car by myself I will sing praises to God. When it is just me I don’t have to worry about how loud I am being or feel self-conscious when my voice cracks. Sometimes I’ll sing an old familiar hymn like “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing.” Other times I will sing spontaneous songs of praise. They may not be the most beautiful songs ever written, but they express the cry of my heart in that moment. I love singing unto God. I think it is one of the sweetest privileges we have as believers. It is amazing to think that God not only hears our prayers, He also listens to our music.

He hears each note sung and every chord struck. Like a father watching his child play at his first piano recital, I can picture our Heavenly Father with a big grin and a camcorder in His hand. He loves every second of our songs written for Him. They bring a smile to His face. And He never forgets them; He never tapes over the footage.

Rest assured that God isn’t phased by a wrong notes. He doesn’t cringe when our instruments are a little out of tune. You see, God listens to more than our music; He listens to our hearts. We can play all the right notes, but have the wrong motives. We can have our instruments tuned perfectly, but our hearts not tuned “to sing [His] grace .” We don’t sing to impress God or earn His love. We sing because we love Him. We sing because we are free. We sing because He is worthy of our songs and so much more.

And all the while, He is singing over us. Read the words of Zephaniah 3:17 carefully:

The Lord your God is with you,
the Mighty Warrior who saves.
He will take great delight in you;
in his love he will no longer rebuke you,
but will rejoice over you with singing.

The Lord of All Creation is so delighted in us, His children, that He sings songs of rejoicing! Even with all of our sin and repeated failures, He still delights in us. Friend, if the god you serve isn’t singing, he isn’t the One True God. A god who isn’t rejoicing over his people is probably a god who shouts only words of condemnation. But the God of the Bible remembers our sins no more (Hebrews 8:12).  I pray that these verses would be a reminder to us all of how much God loves us.

I don’t know about you, but I feel a song coming on…

What Do I Believe About...Angels and Demons?

What Do I Believe About…Angels and Demons?

I believe that angels are spiritual beings created by God to be His messengers. Whether they are around the throne room of God, or ministering here on the earth, they are ceaseless in their worship and obedience towards the LORD. Angels, while glorious in nature, are not created in the image of God. They are, however, powerful warriors with God as their commander, and have been given the capacity to take on human form. Angels were also given the important roles of ministering to the saints of God and bringing about judgement on the wicked (Ps 103:19-21; Matt 1:20-23; Heb 1:14; Rev 7-8).

I believe that like mankind, angels were created as moral creatures. They have the capacity for sin. Unlike mankind, however, angels who rebelled against God have no hope of salvation. Their fate has been eternally sealed by Him. These fallen angels are better known as demons, with Satan (Lucifer) being their leader (1 Tim 5:21; 2 Pet 2:4; Rev 12:7-12).

I believe that Satan and his demons are enemies of God and His people. Satan has been deceiving mankind from the very beginning, starting with Eve. Before we are born again and made children of God, we are children of a different father, the Devil. Satan is currently the prince of this fallen world, but one day he and his demons will be judged and cast into the lake of fire. Believers should be watchful and aware of demonic activity, but they have no reason to fear the powers of darkness because Christ defeated them on the cross. Satan has never been, nor will he ever be God’s equal (Gen 3; John 8:44-45; Eph 2:2; Rev 20:10).


I hope this helps aid you in your study of God’s Word. Please don’t shy away from asking any questions you might have. Also, if you see something that concerns you from a theological standpoint please let me know. I am not inerrant. 

What Will Heaven Be Like? Part 2

What Will Heaven Be Like? Part 2

Yesterday, I wrote briefly about how there is no sin or death in heaven. Today I want to talk about some of the implications of this reality. How does the absence of sin affect the nature of our eternity in heaven? What does this look like exactly? Here is part 2:

There is so suffering or pain in heaven.

Revelation 21:4 says, “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”

While there is much we don’t know about the reality of heaven, we do know that it is a place of eternal happiness. According to this verse, there are no saints in heaven crying about anything. There are no saints dealing with back pain or emotional trauma from their past. Furthermore, there is no indication that the saints of God will be haunted by their sins for all eternity either. Truly, the former things have passed away. In heaven, every wrong will be made right. Every sickness and pain will be healed. That is why it is important that we set our minds upon the things that are above (Colossians 3:1-2). Perhaps the Lord will heal us of some physical ailment here on earth. Even if He does, we could get sick again. And eventually we will die. But, when when we “wake up” in heaven we will never have to worry about pain, sickness, or sorrow ever again.

Have you ever stopped to think about the unemployment rate of heaven? There won’t be any work for nurses or doctors because we will be completely healed by the Great Physician. Counselors won’t have any clients because every saint will talking with the Wonderful Counselor. Even florists will be out of a job because there will be no headstones to put flowers on. We will be alive forever singing praises to the Resurrected Savior.

In other words, there will be no hindrances to our eternal worship of God. In fact, we will have even more to thank God for once He wipes away every tear from our eyes. The wiping of our tears won’t be His dismissal of our pain and suffering experienced in this fallen world, it will be the comforting touch of our Father who says, “Come here, my child. Everything is going to be alright.” What an incredible promise Revelation 21:4 is for those who are in Christ Jesus. Amen? I will leave you with the words of Charles Wesley in his hymn entitled, “Away with our sorrow and fear.”

Our mourning is all at an end,
When, raised by the life-giving Word,
We see the new city descend,
Adorned as a bride for her Lord;
The city so holy and clean,
No sorrow can breathe in the air;
No gloom of affliction or sin,
No shadow of evil is there.

Not Every Miracle is Holy

Not Every Miracle is Holy

So Moses and Aaron went to Pharaoh and did just as the Lord commanded. Aaron cast down his staff before Pharaoh and his servants, and it became a serpent. Then Pharaoh summoned the wise men and the sorcerers, and they, the magicians of Egypt, also did the same by their secret arts. For each man cast down his staff, and they became serpents. But Aaron’s staff swallowed up their staffs. Still Pharaoh’s heart was hardened, and he would not listen to them, as the Lord had said. Exodus 7:11-13


If you were a kid growing up in the early 2000’s, you probably saw this scene play out in the movie The Prince of Egypt. There is a song in the movie called “Playing With the Big Boys” where the magicians and sorcerers of Egypt go head to head with Aaron and Moses. In reality, it was a match up between the Egyptian gods and Yahweh, the God of Israel—unholy vs. holy.

Aaron’s staff turning into a serpent was nothing special to these magicians. They were able to do the same thing by appealing to their occult practices. Recently, I have heard similar testimonies from my Thai Christian friends. One friend said that he knew someone who had severely broken his arm in an accident. Instead of going to the hospital, this man visited the local witch doctor. According to my friend’s testimony, the man’s arm was at least visibly, if not completely, healed.

As we read through the 10 plagues in Exodus, we see that the magicians were able to duplicate several miracles that Aaron and Moses did. They were able to turn water into blood and bring frogs up onto the land. However, once the third plague (gnats) came, the magicians were no longer able to recreate the miracles. In Exodus 8:19, they tell Pharaoh that “this is the finger of God.” The magicians realized that they were outmatched. But, they should have realized it when their serpents were swallowed up before.

Satan has some power and lots of tricks. He is able to do some miraculous things, but he never does them with good or holy intentions. So, why does he do them exactly? Because this is what people want to see (Matthew 16:1). They want the miracles without Jesus. They want healing without having to call Jesus, “Lord Luke 17:12-18).” They want power to carry out their own sinful will and desires (Acts 8:18-19); whereas, the Holy Spirit gives us power to do the will of God. Satan will try do whatever he can to deceive people all the way to their destruction. And the miraculous things the devil is doing in the world shouldn’t be thought of as counterfeits. They are so real and believable that even the elect will be led astray by them, according to Jesus (Matthew 24:24).

As pastor David Guzik has said: “Miracles can prove that something is supernatural, but they cannot prove that something is true.” The only thing we can trust is the goodness and truthfulness of God’s Word. Everything he does is holy and righteous (Psalm 145:17). Trust Him in everything. Seek His face more than His hand. Test every miracle against the Word of God because even our senses are affected by our fallen nature. Today as you reflect on the wonder-working power of our holy God, remember the words of the psalmist, Asaph:

I will remember the deeds of the LORD;
yes, I will remember your wonders of old.
I will ponder all your work,
and meditate on your mighty deeds.
Your way, O God, is holy.
What god is great like our God?
You are the God who works wonders;
you have made known your might among the peoples.
You with your arm redeemed your people,
the children of Jacob and Joseph. Selah

Psalm 77:11-15

Lord, Send Someone Else

Lord, Send Someone Else

It is no secret that foreign mission work is difficult. It requires you to move away from your friends and family, away from the comforts of home. Upon stepping off the plane you are immediately thrown into a whole new world. The food is different. The smells are different. They don’t speak English everywhere. They drive on the other side of the road. In some areas, maybe they don’t have electricity. They worship false gods. It is so easy to say, “Lord, I just don’t think I am cut out for this. Surely, there are more qualified people who You can send.” We look at ourselves in the mirror of the task at hand and we start pointing at all of our weaknesses. We think our weaknesses will somehow prove to God that we aren’t the ones he wants, like we know better. You see, we like to use our weaknesses to make excuses, but God wants to use them to demonstrate His power.

Remember what Moses said to God that day at the burning bush? Moses, one of the greatest and godliest men in all of history actually told God to “send someone else (Exodus 4:13).” Was it because He didn’t know God was truly with Him? No! YHWH (I AM WHO I AM) was speaking to Him from a burning bush that wasn’t being consumed. God had shown him that he would confirm Moses’ words with signs and wonders (staff turning into the serpent, Moses’ hand becoming diseased then healed again, God’s promise to turn the Nile water to blood). Even after God reassured Moses that He would help him to speak and teach him what to say, Moses still asked God to send someone else. It was never truly about weakness. It was always a matter of willingness.

The Bible says that God’s anger burned against Moses over his unwillingness (Exodus 4:14). As a result, God told Moses to tell his brother Aaron about the things he heard from Him. Aaron was a gifted speaker, so he would the spokesperson. This seemed like a good idea. Moses hears from God, Moses tells Aaron, and Aaron tells the people. But this isn’t what God had initially commanded Moses in verse 12:

Now go! I will help you speak and I will teach you what to say (my emphasis added).”

And as we see later on in the Old Testament, Moses would face many problems because of his brother. Aaron was the one who led the construction and worship of the golden calf. Aaron’s sons tried to worship God with strange fire and were killed for it. Aaron even led a rebellion against Moses at one point. Aaron’s ability didn’t necessarily produce a willingness to follow God’s commands. Moses would learn this the hard way.

If God calls you to go, then He wants to use you—with all of your weaknesses and shortcomings. He knows that you can’t do it in your own strength. That’s the point! There has only ever been one perfect missionary and His name is Jesus. Moses led God’s people out of slavery in Egypt, but only Jesus can lead people out of slavery from sin. This is the message we have been given to tell the nations: “Jesus can set you free! He did it for me.” When that is your focus, all of the difficulties about got to live in a foreign land seem to fade into the periphery. All of your weaknesses, doubts, and insecurities become in some ways irrelevant. The God of the universe has called you out; He wants to use you as His messenger to the nations. How can we make excuses when people are perishing? The only acceptable response to God is one of willingness: “Please, Lord, send me!”