What Do Christians Look Like?

What Do Christians Look Like?

When I was in high school, my church’s youth group would go to a conference called Winter Xtreme in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Perhaps some of you have heard of it. It is a jam-packed weekend of Christians bands and speakers. I remember regularly hearing Casting Crowns and NewSong perform at these events, much to the delight of everyone in attendance. These guys are considered CCM royalty at this point. But, one year a much different band took the stage by the name of Flyleaf. They sounded and looked nothing like Casting Crowns or NewSong. Instead, they looked like this:

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Their music was loud and aggressive. All of the band members were wearing black clothes and eyeliner. The guitarist and bass player were spinning around on stage while playing. And the lead singer, Lacey Sturm, was screaming some of the lyrics at times. It was such a shock to the youth groups in attendance that some people started to boo, while others packed up their things and left. My youth leaders decided to let each of us decide whether or not we wanted to stay. I decided to stay because, well, I liked their sound. And as a drummer myself, I wanted to watch their drummer because he was playing with such speed and velocity.

By the time Flyleaf was on their second or third song, almost half of the audience was gone. It is such a shame because during their set, Lacey Sturm, gave one of the clearest explanations of the Gospel I have ever heard. She also shared her testimony about how close she was to committing suicide before she heard the Gospel herself. That night, I remember many students going forward to receive Christ for the first time. I know that the Lord used her story to reach young people battling the same issues.

I can’t help but wonder about all of the people who left before she shared her story. How many leaders and parents took their students out because they passed a quick judgment on Flyleaf’s looks and music? I have been to many Christian concerts over the years, but I honestly don’t remember hearing a lead singer stop the show in order to share the Gospel. You see, there is a danger in looking at someone and saying, “There is no way they are Christians, just look at them!” What does a Christian look like, anyway?

If a suit and tie made people Christians, I’d buy them for everyone I could. If eating Chick-fil-a could save you, I’d buy as many chicken sandwiches as I could afford. If people could become born again simply by using essential oils, I’d give them out to every person I could come in contact with. But these things aren’t what makes you a Christian.

Sure, you will see many genuine Christians wearing suits, eating Chick-fil-a, and using essential oils, but these reveal nothing about their standing with God. It doesn’t matter what we look like on the outside. What matters is what has taken place within the depths of our souls. Please listen to me—you can look Christian and still end up in hell. You can wear all the Christian t-shirts, own an ESV Study Bible, listen to TobyMac, teach a Sunday School class, even preach behind a pulpit and still not know the One, True, Living God.  

Have you repented of your sins and trusted in Jesus as your personal Savior? Have you been redeemed by the blood of the Lamb? 

God is calling people from every tribe, nation, tongue…and walk of life. Just because someone doesn’t look like you doesn’t mean that they don’t know Jesus. Rejoice in how diversely beautiful the body of Christ is already and will be once the Great Commission is fulfilled. Thank God that Christians can look like you, like Casting Crowns, like Flyleaf, like anyone who calls upon the name of the Lord. Maybe Lacey Sturm didn’t look like someone I’d see at my church, but on that night, she looked like Jesus.

Confronting Male Body Image Issues

Confronting Male Body Image Issues

Did anyone ever make fun of your appearance growing up? For most of my life, I was the skinniest kid in my class, so I heard a lot of teasing. I often heard things like “you need to eat a sandwich” or “man, drink a milkshake or something.” I never had any real bullies in school, but I had my fair share of people laugh and make fun of me for my size and appearance.

I wish I could say that their words didn’t hurt me, but they did. I felt like I was less than a man compared to some of my more muscular, athletic friends. And I wish I could say things were different at church, but they weren’t. In fact, some of the most hurtful comments came from brothers in Christ. Ironically, at church, I was learning about how my body was a temple of the Holy Spirit. But at home and school, I was constantly dwelling on how much I disliked the temple God have given me. Dislike may be too soft of a word. In reality, I hated my body at times.

For a long time, I thought I was the only guy who felt this way. Boy was I wrong. As I got older, I realized that most guys struggle with body insecurities. And it doesn’t matter how old they are, how much muscle they have, or what their body fat percentage is. Every guy has something about their bodies they wish they could change. It is no exaggeration that men think if we could just change that one thing then all of our problems in life would be solved. But, I can tell you from experience that this simply isn’t true.

Men, the only thing that can free us from self-hatred is to understand how God sees us. Whether we look like Gumby or Hercules, God says that we are all made in His image. Masculinity cannot be obtained. It doesn’t come through bench presses or dead lifts; it is part of our identity.  We are masculine because God created us this way.

The Bible says that Jesus “He had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him, nothing in his appearance that we should desire him (Isaiah 53:2).” Nowhere in the Gospels does it say that Jesus was handsome or had a six pack, even though some artists depict Him in this way. That doesn’t mean He was “ugly.” But it does tell us that Jesus didn’t need good looks in order to do the will of the Father. Jesus didn’t need a strong jaw line and winning smile to be the sacrifice for my sins. I have yet to see Jesus face to face, but I already know that His beauty is beyond compare because of who He is and what He has done for me.

If our eyes are fixed on the cross, brothers, that leaves no time for us to look in the mirror. We should devote time to exercise and taking care of our bodies, as this pleases the Lord. I have come to really enjoy working out as a family. But we should devote our entire lives to becoming more godly, more like the God-man Jesus (1 Timothy 4:8). There will be days we struggle with our body image, but we will be more prepared to deal with them if we’ve been devoting ourselves to the Lord.

Finally brothers, a few suggestions:

  1. Know God loves you. It is He who created You for His glory. He knit you together in your mother’s womb.
  2. Lift up your fellow brother more than you lift a weight.
  3. Don’t include or exclude someone based on their appearance.
  4. Repent of any self-hatred. Ask God to help you see yourself the way He sees you.
  5. Forgive people who had said hurtful things. It is likely they are battling insecurity as well.
  6. Rejoice in the truth that one day we will be given resurrection bodies, unmarred by our sin.
Our God is a Gardener

Our God is a Gardener

Many Christians are familiar with Jesus’ I AM statement in John chapter 15, but few remember Jesus’ “my Father is” statement in the same chapter. Many of us have  memorized John 15:5 in Sunday School or Vacation Bible School. “I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing.” But have we memorized verses 1 and 2 of the same chapter? They read:

I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinedresser. Every branch in me that does not bear fruit he takes away, and every branch that does bear fruit he prunes, that it may bear more fruit.

Did you know the Heavenly Father is a gardener? He’s got pruning shears in His hands. And according to Jesus, He actually uses them. He checks on each of His branches to see how they are doing. If they aren’t bearing fruit, He simply takes them away. Why? Because they are already dead. They can’t and won’t bear any fruit if they are dead. Jesus teaches that these branches will eventually be gathered up and burned (John 15:6).

Now if a branch is bearing fruit, the Father doesn’t just leave it alone. He doesn’t walk on by. No, he starts pruning and does so in love. He rejoices to see that the branch is producing fruit, but like every good vinedresser He desires to see even more. A vinedresser glories in the fruit of his labor, right? He doesn’t want just any fruit— He wants to see healthy, ripe, and abundant fruit. It should be our desire to bring glory to the Father by bearing the most beautiful fruit the world has ever seen. After all, this is how we prove to be His disciples (John 15:8). But, if this is going to happen, the Father has to use His shears. It can be a painful process; in fact, it will be a painful process. But ultimately, if it for our good and His glory. English theologian and Bible commentator, John Trapp, had this to say about God’s pruning:

And if it be painful to bleed, it is worse to wither. Better be pruned to grow than cut up to burn.

This is true, is it not? What is a cut compared to fire?

In the end, this all boils down to bearing good fruit. But, don’t forget the verse I said you probably already memorized, John 15:5. We can’t bear any of this fruit on our own. We must be abiding in Christ. Like branches to a vine, we must be attached to our source of life if we are to live! Praise the Lord for sending us His Spirit to help us to abide in Him.

Finally, remember that when the Father is pruning, Jesus never leaves us. He is with us through all the pain. He clings to us ever so tightly. And it isn’t just that He is close by or near in proximity. Rather, we are truly in Him and He in us.

John 15:4 “Abide in me, and I in you…”

Martin Luther’s "The Freedom of a Christian"

Every Christian Should Read: Martin Luther’s “The Freedom of a Christian”

Don’t let the title or length of this blog post intimidate you. I know it looks very academic and wordy, but if you will stick with it I believe you will come understand some essential truths of the Christian faith that will truly free you to live as a servant to all people. This paper was originally submitted for my Church History class at Asia Biblical Theological Seminary.


Introduction to Martin Luther

Martin Luther was a German monk, theologian, and perhaps, the most influential figure of the Reformation. Luther’s name was thrust into the limelight “in 1517 with his Ninety-Five theses criticizing the abuse of indulgences (The New Westminster Dictionary of Church History, 399).” In addition to his emphasis on the priesthood of every Christian, Luther stressed the Bible as the “only source of religious authority (sola Scriptura),” and grace though faith, not works “as the sole means of human salvation (sola fide)” in his writings (www.brittanica.com, “Martin Luther”). One of his greatest contributions was the translation of the Bible into German, the vernacular of the common people. While Martin Luther was by no means a perfect man, his works have helped myriads understand how we can approach the One who is.

Introduction to the Document

Luther’s The Freedom of a Christian, sometimes referred to as, “A Treatise on Christian Liberty” was written in 1520 (class notes, 43). By the time it was released, Luther had written two other important books (Address to the Christian Nobility and The Babylonian Captivity of the Church) calling for drastic reform and had developed a significant following (329). Dedicated to Pope Leo X, the document came out just a year before Luther was excommunicated by the Roman Catholic Church (class notes, 43). Although “it was written in a conciliatory spirit,” Luther makes it apparent that he views the Pope “as an equal (329-330).” In The Freedom of a Christian, Luther presents his “evangelical views” on the relationship between faith and works (330). Ultimately, he “makes clear that a believing Christian is free from sin through faith in God, yet bound by love to serve his neighbor (330).”

Summary

  1. Dedication and Open Letter to Pope Leo X
  2. Introduction
    1. The freedom of the spirit
    2. The bondage of the spirit
  3. Considering the inner man
    1. Righteousness through faith alone
    2. Priests and kings
  4. Considering the outer man
    1. What good are good works?
    2. Criteria for truly good works
  5. A middle course vs.
    1. Ceremonialists (lacking faith)
    2. Weak in the faith
  6. Final words on ceremonies

Luther’s treatise is preceded by a brief letter to the mayor of Zwickau, Herman Mühlphordt, making mention of their mutual friend, Johann Egran; Luther esteems both gentlemen as learned and wise (333). Luther explains that Egran has described Mühlphordt as a man with a great “love for and pleasure in Holy Scripture,” who stands in stark contrast to those “who oppose the truth with all their power in cunning (333).” In order to honor their new friendship, Luther dedicates the “treatise” in German to him, whereas the Latin version was dedicated to the pope (333).

In his open letter to the pope, Luther assures Pope Leo X that he still has the highest respect for him, despite what others may have said. Luther refers to him as “most blessed father,” “Your Blessedness,” even “a Daniel in Babylon (334).” Luther hopes that the letter will “vindicate” him in Leo’s eyes, as well as, properly explain what he is actually taking issue with (335). For Luther, the point of contention is actually the Roman Curia, which he claims, “is more corrupt than any Babylon or Sodom ever was (336).” He goes as far to say that the Roman Curia deserves to have Satan as its pope, instead of a righteous man like Leo (337). Luther adds that Johann Eck was another enemy of the pope, furthermore “a notable enemy of Christ” Himself (338). According to Luther, Eck’s debating only made matters worse (340). And though Eck would have him to be silent out of fear of the pope, Luther makes clear that he has “more courage than that (340).” Luther concludes the letter by once more blessing Leo; however, he makes obvious that he does not view him as a “demigod,” or the “lord of the world” as some would believe (341). He instead, refers to Leo as a “servant of servants,” following the tradition and example of the apostles (341-342). As such, Luther prays that Leo would put a stop to those who “have been too literally [Christ’s] vicars,” for Christ is not absent, but dwells in the hearts of His servants (342).

Luther begins his treatise on Christian Liberty by presenting the “two propositions” he seeks to make clear for the “unlearned (344).” First, “A Christian is a perfectly free lord of all, subject to none;” second, “A Christian is a perfectly dutiful servant of all, subject to all (344).” Luther acknowledges that these may seem to contradict one another at first glance. However, he notes that they are simply a reiteration of what the Apostle Paul said in 1 Corinthians 9:19 and other places in his letters (344). In order to explain this dichotomy of being a “free man and a servant” more fully, Luther transitions into a discussion about the “twofold nature” of man (344).

Luther starts by examining the nature of the inner man, and how it is that a man can become free. He claims that external things have no way of “producing Christian righteousness or freedom, or in producing unrighteousness or servitude (345).” How one dresses, eats, prays, etc. play no part in making a person righteous, for even wicked people can do these things (345). Luther says there is one thing that has the power to make a man free, and that is the “holy Word of God, the gospel of Christ (345).” Furthermore, Luther states simply that the soul is “justified by faith alone and not any works (346).” And this faith, according to Luther, takes place within the inner man alone (347).

He then goes on to explain that the commandments and promises found in Scripture cannot be kept or claimed through any kind of work (348). He writes, “God our Father has made all things depend on faith so that whoever has faith will have everything, and whoever does not have faith will have nothing (349).” Luther summarizes this idea by saying that there is no work that can equal the power of faith (349). There are three main aspects to the power of faith, says Luther. First, it makes “the law and works unnecessary for any man’s righteousness and salvation (350).” Second, it enables the Christian to regard God as truthful and trustworthy (350-351). Third, Luther states that faith “unites the soul with Christ as a bride is united with her bridegroom (351).” Luther repeats himself once more by saying that works are incapable of accomplishing such things; however, they are not useless to him. He argues, “they can, if faith is present, be done to the glory of God (353).”

Luther then describes how every Christian is both a priest and a king, not by blood, but by faith (354). He argues that Christians are exalted even higher over things than earthly kings are, for “nothing can do [them] any harm (354).” Luther makes sure to note that this does not mean Christians are free from suffering, rather it means, by faith, a Christian can say, ‘all things are working together for my good’ (355).” As good as this kingship is, Luther believes that each Christian’s priesthood “is far more excellent” in nature (355). Unlike unbelievers, priests have the privilege to go before God, even pray for and teach others (355). For Luther, such freedom, liberty, and honor in the inner is the result of faith, and faith alone (356-357).

Luther now turns to address the outer man, specifically answering the question: “If faith does all things and is alone sufficient unto righteousness, why then are good works commanded (358)?” To this Luther replies that works are not done to obtain righteousness, instead they are done “freely only to please God (360).” Luther uses the analogy of a tree and its fruit to explain also that any “good” things done prior to becoming a Christian amount to nothing (361). He claims that the tree must precede the fruit. Furthermore, the fruit does not make the tree good or bad; instead, the tree dictates what the fruit will be (361). Luther tags on that a “tree” is only made good through faith, and evil through unbelief—works have nothing to do with it (362). Yet, Luther wants to make clear that he does “not reject works;” he simply does not view their role the way the, as he calls them, “blind leaders of the blind” view them (362-363).

He states that good works are not done for oneself, but out of love for one’s neighbor (364). Luther argues that the Christian is to follow Christ’s example in becoming a servant to all, for this is how “God through Christ has dealt and still deals with him (366).” Sadly, writes Luther, most people are taught to only look out for themselves and desire the praise from men (368). The purpose of doing good works, according to Luther, is to either keep one’s body in control or to serve one’s neighbor, anything else is neither “good [nor] Christian (370).” Luther sums up by saying a Christian “lives in Christ through faith, in his neighbor through love (371).”

At this junction, Luther explains two errors in some people’s understanding of “the freedom of faith (371).” Some people use it as an opportunity to do whatever they want, disregarding everything “that pertains to Christian religion (372).” Others focus so much on ceremonies that they “do not care a fig for the things which are the essence of our faith (372).” Luther proposes that Christians “take a middle course (373).” In other words, Christians should joyfully exercise their freedom in Christ, while being mindful of those who are weak in the faith, citing Paul in Romans chapter 14 (373-374).

Luther concludes his treatise with some final thoughts on ceremonies (374-377). Luther argues that ceremonies, although people can be “imprisoned” by them, are not wrong in themselves (375). He likens them to a builder’s plans— “they are prepared, not as a permanent structure, but because without them nothing could be built or made (376).” Once the building has been completed, the plans are no longer needed (376). Luther makes obvious that it is not ceremonies or works that he has problems with. His problems lie with those who hold to a faulty understanding of how and why a Christian does them, as well as what they actually accomplish (376-377).

Significance of the Document

The significance of Luther’s The Freedom of a Christian cannot be overstated in terms of its effect on the Protestant Reformation. Luther, as he made clear in his introduction of the treatise, set out to make these essential theological truths understandable to the common people. Protestants today welcome doctrines such as righteousness by faith alone, the priesthood of every Christian, and good works done out of love for one’s neighbor largely because of Luther’s work here. Also, we see in the way that Luther addresses Pope Leo X in The Freedom of a Christian that he is applying the truths he has found in Scripture to his own life. In this way, this treatise is very pastoral in its nature, not simply a theological exercise. This is perhaps why it is still being read and admired by Christians hundreds of years later. Martin Luther’s The Freedom of a Christian is not only an important historical document of the Reformation; it is a wealth of knowledge and truth for Christians today who desire to understand biblically the relationship between faith and works.

Baby Bird Christians

Baby Bird Christians

Are you a baby bird Christian?

Do you live comfortably in a nest that was prepared for you by someone else? Do you situate yourself high up in the trees away from all the creatures that creep and crawl below? Do you spend most of your time crying out to be fed? Do you live off what others have regurgitated instead of taking time to chew your own food?

At one point in time it was cute, right? You were this little born again hatchling. But that was years ago, decades for some. You’re suppose to be grown by now. Your supposed to be flying around, sowing seeds of the Gospel. You’re suppose to be helping others learn to soar in their relationship with the Lord. Instead, you’re still where you were on day one. You’re still crying out to be fed baby food. It used to be a sweet sound in the ears of other Christians. Now it is just, well…annoying.

If this describes you, it is time for you to leave the nest. It is time for you to eat solid food. Furthermore, it’s time for mature believers to encourage them to do so. Pastors and teachers, we aren’t helping them by giving in to their demands. Would I be a good father if I only gave my daughter cookies (her favorite snack) to eat? No; if she is to grow up to be healthy and strong, she is going to have to eat some fruits and vegetables. The same goes for baby bird Christians. Occasionally, spiritual parents are going to have to show some tough love.

I hope this doesn’t sound too harsh or judgmental. Listen, I had to be told these same things at one point in time, and I am better for it. I thank God for the more mature Christians He used to help me grow up in the Lord. And believe me, I still have a lot of growing to do, but it won’t be from the nest. I’m taking to the skies.

1 Corinthians 3:2 “I gave you milk to drink, not solid food, since you were not yet ready for it. In fact, you are still not ready…”

Hebrews 5:12-14 “Although by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to reteach you the basic principles of God’s word. You need milk, not solid food. For everyone who lives on milk is still an infant, inexperienced in the message of righteousness. But solid food is for the mature, who by constant use have trained their senses to distinguish good from evil.”

3 Reasons Why Your Church Needs an Online Presence

3 Reasons Why Your Church Needs an Online Presence

Is it okay if I step up on my soapbox for a moment? This is a subject that I am very passionate about. In fact, one of the main reasons I freelance as a web designer is because I want to help churches develop their own online presence and ministries. I believe it is important for three reasons. Let me tell you why.

1. People will ask Google before they ask you.

If we have a question about something we know nothing about, what is they first thing we do? We pull out our smart devices, open our browsers and search for the answer. We trust Google with everything nowadays. Where’s the closest library? Is there a swimming pool nearby? Where can I find a Thai restaurant in Atlanta? And about 90% of the time, we find exactly what we are looking for. So, if someone in your neighborhood searches for “churches near me,” you want to make sure your church is listed. Not only that, your church needs to have a good looking, winsome website. In today’s world, your website is essentially your church’s first impression. It tells people everything they need to know about your congregation before you go. Your church could have the best music, best preacher, and the sweetest people in the world; if your website looks sloppy, people will not want to visit. It is as simple as that.

2. Believers are spending more and more time on their phones.

According to the Barna Group’s “State of the Bible 2018” study:

More than half of [Bible] users now search for Bible content on the internet (57%) or a smartphone (55%), and another 42 percent use a Bible app on their phones.

We live in a day when people don’t have to wait until Sunday or Wednesday night to hear a sermon. We have 24/7 access to Bible teaching via the internet. I have heard from several pastors that they are working on developing blogs and podcasts to keep up with the growing need for biblical resources online. Your church’s online presence isn’t just for nonbelievers; it is also for your members. Your church’s website and social media pages should serve as a tool for helping your congregation grow in spiritual maturity. With a website you can upload sermon audio, post your church’s statement of faith, explain the Gospel in a video, etc. And your members can access these things at any time. Don’t waste this opportunity to edify and strengthen your brothers and sisters in Christ.

3. The Gospel is in everyone’s pocket. They just need to be notified.

Let’s just admit it. We all love seeing that we have notifications on social media. There is something about that little red bell that makes us feel like others care about us. Most of our notifications are simply likes on our selfies and comments on the funny meme we shared. Church, we are missing so many opportunities here. Through social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat we have a direct connection to our friends’ lives. We have been given a digital soapbox to share the Gospel with them wherever they are. Someone’s eternity could change with one post, message, or share.

This has huge implications for missions as well. In fact, I know of many people here in Thailand who live in very remote areas in the mountains. They may not have cars or fancy homes, but they have Facebook and email. I should note that nothing will ever take the place of face-to-face witnessing and evangelism. But, God is doing some incredible things through Internet evangelism ministries like GlobalRize (who are always in need of volunteers, by the way).  We would be foolish to neglect this incredible opportunity in the history of world missions.


I hope this has helped you understand how important an online presence is for the local church. If you are interested in learning about how to develop one for your local church, please do not hesitate to contact me. I would love to talk with you. In the meantime, feel free to check out my web design portfolio for some examples of websites I have designed in the past. May the Lord bless you as you seek to make Him know all over the world [wide web].

Lord, Send Someone Else

Lord, Send Someone Else

It is no secret that foreign mission work is difficult. It requires you to move away from your friends and family, away from the comforts of home. Upon stepping off the plane you are immediately thrown into a whole new world. The food is different. The smells are different. They don’t speak English everywhere. They drive on the other side of the road. In some areas, maybe they don’t have electricity. They worship false gods. It is so easy to say, “Lord, I just don’t think I am cut out for this. Surely, there are more qualified people who You can send.” We look at ourselves in the mirror of the task at hand and we start pointing at all of our weaknesses. We think our weaknesses will somehow prove to God that we aren’t the ones he wants, like we know better. You see, we like to use our weaknesses to make excuses, but God wants to use them to demonstrate His power.

Remember what Moses said to God that day at the burning bush? Moses, one of the greatest and godliest men in all of history actually told God to “send someone else (Exodus 4:13).” Was it because He didn’t know God was truly with Him? No! YHWH (I AM WHO I AM) was speaking to Him from a burning bush that wasn’t being consumed. God had shown him that he would confirm Moses’ words with signs and wonders (staff turning into the serpent, Moses’ hand becoming diseased then healed again, God’s promise to turn the Nile water to blood). Even after God reassured Moses that He would help him to speak and teach him what to say, Moses still asked God to send someone else. It was never truly about weakness. It was always a matter of willingness.

The Bible says that God’s anger burned against Moses over his unwillingness (Exodus 4:14). As a result, God told Moses to tell his brother Aaron about the things he heard from Him. Aaron was a gifted speaker, so he would the spokesperson. This seemed like a good idea. Moses hears from God, Moses tells Aaron, and Aaron tells the people. But this isn’t what God had initially commanded Moses in verse 12:

Now go! I will help you speak and I will teach you what to say (my emphasis added).”

And as we see later on in the Old Testament, Moses would face many problems because of his brother. Aaron was the one who led the construction and worship of the golden calf. Aaron’s sons tried to worship God with strange fire and were killed for it. Aaron even led a rebellion against Moses at one point. Aaron’s ability didn’t necessarily produce a willingness to follow God’s commands. Moses would learn this the hard way.

If God calls you to go, then He wants to use you—with all of your weaknesses and shortcomings. He knows that you can’t do it in your own strength. That’s the point! There has only ever been one perfect missionary and His name is Jesus. Moses led God’s people out of slavery in Egypt, but only Jesus can lead people out of slavery from sin. This is the message we have been given to tell the nations: “Jesus can set you free! He did it for me.” When that is your focus, all of the difficulties about got to live in a foreign land seem to fade into the periphery. All of your weaknesses, doubts, and insecurities become in some ways irrelevant. The God of the universe has called you out; He wants to use you as His messenger to the nations. How can we make excuses when people are perishing? The only acceptable response to God is one of willingness: “Please, Lord, send me!”